April 22, 2014
Faced with a burgeoning digital landscape, traditional commercial-television networks had already established a “rear-guard” mentality wetted to the status quo by the time the Aereo case hit the U.S. Supreme Court in 2014. At the time, rather than paying a cable fee, that company picked up television signals on the public airwaves and sent customers the signals over the internet (charging for use of the receptors).

Faced with a burgeoning digital landscape, traditional commercial-television networks had already established a “rear-guard” mentality wetted to the status quo by the time the Aereo case hit the U.S. Supreme Court in 2014. At the time, rather than paying a cable fee, that company picked up television signals on the public airwaves and sent customers the signals over the internet (charging for use of the receptors).

April 22, 2014
The Internet Eclipsing Television Networks: Toto, We’re not in Kansas Anymore

Before the advent of cable television, “television” was free; and yet well into the cable era the default assumption was that television should be paid for, which implies that the public airwaves had somehow been privatized. “You can’t take our signal. You just can’t,” said Les Moonvies, CEO of CBS, as if he were some rejected child-actor.[2] Imagine if a network CEO had made a similar exclamation in the 1960s. “They’re my airwaves, Mine!”

From: http://thewordenreport-governmentandmarkets.blogspot.com/2014/04/the-internet-eclipsing-television.html

April 20, 2014
Film: Transcendence

Does a film narrative that lasts over two hours really need to jump to a whole new level every twenty minutes lest the audience otherwise drift away in unsatisfied boredom? The embellishments can easily detract from the credibility of the film’s main subject-matter—in this case, what it would be like for a human being’s life-span to be extended past the duration of the corporeal body (including the brain) by means of consciousness in neuro-artificial intelligence.

April 20, 2014
On the Theology of Eucharist: Beyond Historical Divisions

According to a survey, which was led by a sociologist at Catholic University and published in The National Catholic Reporter, 40 percent of 1,442 American Catholic adults said “you can be a good Catholic without believing that in Mass, the bread and wine really become the body and blood of Christ—a core doctrine of Catholicism.” A reporter opines that this “could reflect the decline in Mass attendance. The survey finds it’s fallen from 44% attending at least once a week in 1987 to 31% in 2011, while those who attend less than monthly rose from 26% to 47%. When asked why they don’t go to Mass more often, 40% say they are simply not very religious.” [1] This is a rather broad term; what does it mean to say that someone is religious? Looking back at the history of religion, a neutral party might half-joke that the adjective refers to the proclivity to spar over puerile theological distinctions as if Creation itself hung in the balance. In this essay, I illustrate how such a distinction bearing on the Eucharist (i.e., Holy Communion) can be diffused of its alleged historical significance as warranting Christian division under the taskmaster of (cognitive) uniformity as a placeholder for unity.

April 19, 2014
"A week after Backer’s interview, when $57 million had already been spent by outside groups on the 2014 midterm elections, David Keating, an advocate of the deregulation of campaign finance, put it simply as “money means speech.” Interestingly, Backer backed off such a stark equivalence. “The court did not say, and really neither does any serious commentator, that money is speech. Money is not speech. Money is a necessary tool to engage in political speech and political association.” Money is not speech; rather, money is a necessary prerequisite. Hence Backer treated the right to spend money (on political campaigns) as essentially the right of free speech applied to politics. In other words, the assumed necessity of money for political speech means that the right of free speech in electoral politics is essentially violated if the right to spend money is severed or even truncated."

http://thewordenreport-governmentandmarkets.blogspot.com/2014/04/is-money-speech.html

April 15, 2014
I had to wear a “space suit” of sorts to watch the lunar eclipse in mid-April. 
http://thewordenreport-mycorner.blogspot.com/2014/04/face-to-face-with-lunar-eclipse.html

I had to wear a “space suit” of sorts to watch the lunar eclipse in mid-April. 

http://thewordenreport-mycorner.blogspot.com/2014/04/face-to-face-with-lunar-eclipse.html

April 15, 2014
Face-to-Face with a Lunar Eclipse

Does it really make a difference whether you go outside to watch a lunar eclipse?

April 13, 2014
Discipleship of Women: Jesus's Wife

Was Jesus married? Did he designate his wife as one of his disciples? Did he include Mary, his mother, as a disciple too? Even if only centuries after Jesus the Egyptian (Coptic) Church held that the answers could be “yes,” news of this historical perspective could reshape how people view today’s Christianity.

April 9, 2014
From: http://thewordenreport.blogspot.com/2014/04/making-matters-worse-global-warming-and.html

From: http://thewordenreport.blogspot.com/2014/04/making-matters-worse-global-warming-and.html

April 9, 2014
Making Matters Worse: Global Warming and Income Inequality

Not only is the world as a whole not reducing carbon emissions; 2012 was a record year!  How could this be?  The answer may lie with Darwin’s theory of natural selection.